Buying used Tischer caddy camper, print this off....

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zildjian
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Buying used Tischer caddy camper, print this off....

Post: # 9003Post zildjian
September 30th, 2015, 9:00 pm

When buying any used camper we always recommend taking along a damp meter these are cheaply available from Ebay and simple to use and can save you a lot of money and act as a bargaining tool.£8.79
meter.jpg

Try everything electrical you can, ask about heating and water systems, and decide if its been lucky enough to enjoy winter storage out of the elements or has been damaged in the past



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Body: As with all timber framed campers moisture in the structure is the biggest nightmare. It's unlikely to be an issue unless the unit has been damaged, but as water likes to track everywhere even a little damage can cause big problems over time if left unchecked. Checking with a moisture meter (from the inside) should be considered obligatory. If the van has a shower compartment pay particular attention to this area.

Heating and Fridge: Models vary depending on age and model so not so easy to cover in a few words. All gas appliances need regular servicing though so ask for proof. Even if the appliances are working correctly, if they've not been serviced you will want to get them looked at before trusting them, something worth bearing in mind while negotiating the price.

Battery and Electrical system: Same as any brand. Apart from usual checks that everything is working (including trips) it's always worth having a good look at the wiring itself. You're looking for chafing and for green or black copper on wire ends, which if present could be trouble, possibly necessitating a complete rewire. Batteries don't last forever, any more than 5 years is borrowed time. Assuming the battery has been fully charged then allowed to rest checking the voltage will give a crude indication of the condition, you're looking for 12.6 volts. If the cabin is fitted with a so called 'leisure' battery reckon on replacing it with a proper deep cycle one, the difference is like night and day.

Water system: Unless the system has been maintained with a product like 'Silvertex' it will need a thorough disinfecting before it can be trusted. Not expensive but a real pain, and more ammunition for your negotiations. Obviously worth checking the pipework, pump and taps for leaks and frost damage.

Jacks: Pretty bombproof, but worth checking for correct operation and for cracks on welds. Also popping the plastic cap off and checking for fresh grease. If it's dry or rusty in there it shouldn't be!

Mountings: Again not normally an issue but have a really good look around the mountings for the jacks and truck mounting brackets. Be wary of any signs of damage.

Elevating Roofs. Older models had solid sided elevating roofs which were simple and robust and only really gave problems if not locked down correctly. The mounting frame is timber so look for rot. Construction is simple with no really special parts so any problems should be easy enough to repair

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zildjian
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Re: Buying used Tischer caddy camper, print this off....

Post: # 9217Post zildjian
October 9th, 2015, 7:47 am

"Tischer built vehicle specific campers only. The 'Caddycaemp' was built specifically for the Caddy and came in 2 versions, 'Caddycaemp 2' (2 berth) and 'Caddycaemp 3' (3 berth). Both models had a solid sided elevating roof.

They also produced a very small number of 'Caddycaemp 1's too which had a forward hinged, canvas sided elevating roof. This was actually a more viable camper In the UK
There were no forward mountings, the camper just slid in under the recessed rear cab wall and simple battens lined up with the corrugated truck floor. There was also a carpet covered wooden batten across the front that was shaped to match the car exactly. At the back there were two turnbuckles (one each side of the rear number plate). Their function was only to prevent the cabin from sliding backwards, the shape of the cab and the floor battens stopped any other movement.

Cabins are strong but they are 100% dependant on their timber frame for their integrity so any moisture getting in is bad news. Tischer called (and still call) their construction 'sandwich' construction, but actually only the inner ply wall, frame and styrene core were bonded together. The cabin was screwed together, wires and such like buried in the walls, then the outer skin applied with spray on contact adhesive.


Other campers were produced for Nissan and Toyota 1 tonne trucks and for the VW T2/3 and T2/3 Doka. There were also fixed models on the Mitsubishi L300 and VW T3. The T3 version was available with extended wheelbase (called XL65). Unusually the XL models started off as panel vans not pickups so the bodies were structural. The bodies differed from the demountable and used a stressed GRP outer skin
"

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